Posted by adminvasavi at September 17, 2016 8:39 am Conditions and Treatment

Tonsillectomy is the surgical removal of the tonsils, two oval-shaped pads of tissue at the back of the throat — one tonsil on each side. A tonsillectomy was once a common procedure to treat infection and inflammation of the tonsils (tonsillitis). Today, a tonsillectomy is usually performed for sleep-disordered breathing but may still be a treatment when tonsillitis occurs frequently or doesn’t respond to other treatments. A tonsillectomy may also be necessary to treat breathing and other problems related to enlarged tonsils and to treat rare diseases of the tonsils.

A tonsillectomy is used to treat

Tonsils produce certain types of disease-fighting white blood cells. Therefore, the tonsils are believed to act as the immune system’s first line of defense against bacteria and viruses that enter your mouth.

This function may make them particularly vulnerable to infection and inflammation. The problem is more common in children because the immune system function of tonsils is most active before puberty. Also, unlike an adult’s immune system, a child’s system has had less exposure to bacteria and viruses and has yet to develop immunities to them.

A tonsillectomy may be recommended to prevent frequent, recurring episodes of tonsillitis.

Frequent is generally defined as:

  • More than seven episodes a year
  • More than five episodes a year in each of the preceding two years
  • More than three episodes a year in each of the preceding three years

The procedure may also be recommended if:

A bacterial infection causing tonsillitis doesn’t improve with antibiotic treatment An infection that results in a collection of pus behind a tonsil (tonsillar abscess) doesn’t improve with drug treatment or a drainage procedure.

Complications of enlarged tonsils :

Tonsils may become enlarged after frequent or persistent infections, or they may be naturally
large. A tonsillectomy may be used to treat the following problems caused or complicated by
enlarged tonsils:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Disrupted breathing during sleep
  • Difficulty swallowing

Other diseases of the tonsils : 

A tonsillectomy may also be used to treat other rare diseases or conditions of the tonsils, such as:

  • Cancerous tissue in one or both tonsils
  • Recurrent bleeding from blood vessels near the surface of the tonsils

What can you expect ?
Tonsillectomy is usually done as an outpatient procedure. That means you’ll be able to go home
the day of the surgery. An overnight stay is possible if complications arise or if the surgery is
done on a young child, or if you have a complex medical condition.

During the surgery
Because a tonsillectomy is performed under general anesthesia, you or your child won’t be
aware of the procedure or experience pain during the surgery.
The surgeon may cut out the tonsils using a blade (scalpel) or a specialized surgical tool that uses
heat or high-energy heat or sound waves to remove or destroy tissues and stop bleeding.

During recovery
Nearly everyone experiences pain after a tonsillectomy. Pain is most often in the throat and
frequently in the ears but may also be located in the jaw or the neck.

Steps that you can take to reduce pain, promote recovery and prevent complications include the following:

  • Medications: Take pain medications as directed by your surgeon or the hospital staff.
  • Fluids: It’s important to get plenty of fluids after surgery to avoid dehydration. Water and ice pops are good choices.
  • Food: Bland foods that are easy to swallow, such as applesauce or broth, are the best choices immediately after surgery. Foods such as ice cream and pudding can be added to the diet if they’re tolerated. Foods that are easy to chew and swallow should be added to the diet as soon as possible. Avoid acidic, spicy, hard or crunchy foods as they may cause pain or bleeding.
  • Rest: Bed rest is important for several days after surgery, and strenuous activities — such as running and bike riding — should be avoided for two weeks after surgery. You or your child should be able to return to work or school after resuming a normal diet, sleeping normally through the night and not needing pain medication. Talk to your doctor about any activities that should be avoided.

When to see the doctor or get emergency care?

Watch for the following complications that require prompt medical care:

  • Bleeding:  You may see small specks of dark blood from the nose or in the saliva, but any bright red blood requires a trip to the emergency room for a prompt evaluation and treatment. Surgery to stop bleeding may be necessary
  • Fever:  Call your doctor if you or your child has a fever of 102 F (38.9 C) or higher
  • Dehydration:  Call your doctor if you observe signs of dehydration, such as reduced urination, thirst, weakness, headache, dizziness or lightheadedness. Common signs of dehydration in children include urinating fewer than two or three times a day or crying with no tears
  • Breathing problems:  Snoring or noisy breathing is common during the first week or so of recovery. However, if you or your child is having difficulty breathing, get emergency care

Leave a Comment